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What Are The Best Binge Worthy Shows on Netflix? (Part 2 of 3)

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This is part two of the best TV shows to binge watch from Netflix.  How many of these shows have you watched over time?  This list is just as incredible as the first part.  I personally love comedies, but Netflix is hitting a home run with all the genres.  If you are also into comedies, Brooklyn Nine-Nine is a good bet.  Andy Samburg can make almost anything funny.   Master of None will surprise you, in terms of it being a comedy.  At fist, you think it’s kind of a “light” drama, but it quickly shows you the funny side of Aziz Ansari.  The comedy is subtle, but that’s what makes it such a great show.  Any (and all) of these shows are binge worthy, in my opinion.

Homeland

Homeland is tense. It’s the story of the relationship between a CIA operative and a long-imprisoned ex-Marine, finally liberated from al-Qaeda and returned to America as a war hero – a hero with an abundance of devastating secrets. It’s packed with award-winning performances and believable flawed characters.  There’s just enough politics, in case you’re not overly into that kind of TV show.  It does start to lose its way in the middle seasons, but it’s always entertaining.  And the finale is breathtaking, so you should definitely check it out if you haven’t already.

Brooklyn Nine-Nine

If you’re not already an Andy Samberg fan, Brooklyn Nine-Nine will make you one. That’s not to say he’s the only draw in this comedy cop show, though – the super-childish detective he plays is always at the centre of things, but each of the nut jobs he shares a precinct with have their own hilarious idiosyncrasies, not least of all the seemingly dry and dull Captain Holt.  It is extremely silly and immature, but that’s what makes it so charming.

Sons of Anarchy

All seven seasons of Sons of Anarchy are now streaming on Netflix, so if you haven’t binged on the bloody adventures of SAMCRO, there’s no time like the present.  Or maybe this weekend.  There is plenty of mayhem and butchery to delight you if you’re a thrill seeker, but a lot of the appeal comes from the fact that it’s a Shakespearean family drama.  Which means it’s full of dark secrets, jealousy, sins of the father and backstabbing.

Orange is the New Black

Orange is the New Black is a Netflix original series.  With five seasons under it’s belt, it’s a heavy hitter.  It is based on actual events, which makes it interesting, and unbelievable at times.  It tells the story of a middle-class New Yorker who ends up in a women’s prison for a crime committed ten years before.  Through flashbacks we get to explore her life, and the lives of her fellow inmates before incarceration. Some of the seasons are so gripping, it can be hard to take a break.

Black Mirror

 

Charlie Brooker’s series of standalone tales cautioning against the dangers of technology isn’t exactly what we’d call perfect binge watch fodder – the sheer darkness and cynicism on display can really start to weigh you down after more than a couple of episodes. And yet Black Mirror – now consisting of twelve regular episodes and a Christmas special – is one of the most compelling and fascinating things on TV, particularly for those with an interest in how our lives are affected (some might say infected) by our relationship with smartphones, computers, video games, VR and social media. Stuff readers, we suspect, fall into that category – although you don’t need to be a gadget expert to appreciate the wildly disturbing – yet scarily plausible – scenarios Brooker brings to life.

House of Cards

I feel like I didn’t really know how cut throat American politics are until I started watching House of Cards.  And while the story itself might not be based on true events, my previous statement kind of scares me.  Kevin Spacey gives an amazing portrayal of a ruthless congressman who claws his way to the top.  Without giving too much away,  he partners with his on-screen wife, Robin Wright to deliver this brilliantly chilling rendition of modern day politics. I would say that you should invest in Netflix for House of Cards alone.

Making a Murderer

Steven Avery served 18 years in prison for a horrible crime that he didn’t commit, and the revelations about the police handling of that case could be a 10-part series of their own, but here that’s just the start. You see, just two years after his exoneration, he’s charged with a new crime: the brutal murder of a young woman. Given the circumstances of the previous case, the local Sheriff’s involvement is under serious scrutiny, and to say there are suspicious inconsistencies is a massive understatement.

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

Narcissistic. Sociopathic. Sexist. Elitist. Delusional. And egos the size of a bull elephant. All descriptions that adequately fit every single member of staff at Paddy’s Bar in Philadelphia. From kidnapping cats to poisoning rivals, to stalking love interests and getting drunk at every opportunity, you’re unlikely to ever find a group of people that you hate to love more.

The Office

If you work in an office, you will find The Office funny.  Or at least you’ll find it entertaining, and might get some ideas of how to annoy your coworkers.  If you haven’t seen the original UK version of The Office, you are missing out.  Truly one of the greatest British comedies, The Office was highly influential, hilarious and poignant.

Master of None

I was a bit skeptical about Master of None when I first started watching it.  Especially as a comedy, but Aziz Ansari does an excellent job of telling a story about life and love.  You might even think that Ansari is actually playing himself.  It’s very self-obsessed, but maybe that’s what I find so charming about it.  With two seasons under its belt already, I’m definitely looking forward to the third.